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E.g., 2015-06-30
E.g., 2015-06-30

A new University of Minnesota research study at the intersection of math, genetics, microbiology, ecology and medicine has uncovered a telltale link between colorectal cancer and specific traits of bacteria found in the digestive tract. The findings could improve colorectal cancer treatment and prevention.

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Math on chalkboard

Cracking medical mysteries with math

June 18, 2015

Mathematicians have emerged as some of medicine’s greatest unsung heroes, shedding light on complex biological processes, all to improve patient health.

Source: The Minnesota Medical Foundation

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Improving air quality—in clean and dirty places—could potentially avoid millions of pollution-related deaths each year. That finding comes from a team of environmental engineering and public health researchers who developed a global model of how changes in outdoor air pollution could lead to changes in the rates of health problems such as heart attack, stroke and lung cancer.

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New analysis from the University of Minnesota Accessibility Observatory quantifies an increase in access to jobs since the Green Line LRT and related bus network changes debuted a year ago. The study measured residents’ ability to reach jobs by transit in Minneapolis and St. Paul before and after the Green Line began service on June 14, 2014.

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The use of camera traps – remote automatic cameras triggered by heat or motion – has revolutionized wildlife ecology and conservation research. But the large number of images generated through the traps creates the problem of categorizing and analyzing all the images.

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Tales about “the one that got away” will provide valuable data for managing fisheries resources, thanks to a new initiative by the University of Minnesota and the app company iFish.

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Reuben Harris, Ph.D, was selected by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) as an HHMI Investigator and will receive the flexible support necessary to progress his research in creative new directions.

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A new study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota has found a three-way link among antibiotic use in infants, changes in the gut bacteria, and disease later in life. The imbalances in gut microbes, called dysbiosis, have been tied to infectious diseases, allergies and other autoimmune disorders, and even obesity, later in life.

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A new project will harness the power of genome editing – a technique that allows researchers to precisely target, cut, remove and replace DNA in a living cell – to improve rice, a staple crop that feeds half the world’s people.

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